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Harley has made a lot of changes to their motorcycles over the last 100+ years, but in all that...


Harley has made a lot of changes to their motorcycles over the last 100+ years, but in all that time, one thing has stayed the same, the horn button has always been black.  Sure you can get chrome covers for your late model buttons, but for us vintage guys the options have been black, black or black.  So when I saw some custom colored horn buttons on Instagram, I quickly reached to @knucklejunky to see what they were all about.

Nowadays it seems like anyone who can sew together waxed cotton or leather is making a motorcyc...


Nowadays it seems like anyone who can sew together waxed cotton or leather is making a motorcycle tool roll.  Don't get me wrong, there are some real works of art being produced to keep your oily tools secured, but on a whole, they are all a bit too large for my application.  Like all the VL models, my '33 came from the factory with a locking metal tool box.  It measures in at just under 8", so finding a tool roll that could fit comfortably inside it was a bit of a challenge.

The story of how the first Harley-Davidson Knucklehead stroker motor was built reminds me of thos...


The story of how the first Harley-Davidson Knucklehead stroker motor was built reminds me of those old Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup commercials from the 80’s. Random events would always cause a chocolate bar to land in a jar of peanut butter, resulting in an unexpected and delicious flavor combination. Just like the commercials, random events brought together all the parts to build the first Knucklehead stroker motor and it only took the right person to see how they all went together.

In complete disregard for the water shortage, I decided that before we rode the last 60 miles to ...


In complete disregard for the water shortage, I decided that before we rode the last 60 miles to the coast, my bike was going to be clean.  After nearly 3 weeks on the road and it's tendency to sweat horsepower (i.e. leak oil) there was plenty of grime, bugs and debris that needed to be hosed off.  Once clean, I strapped my camera bag to the luggage rack, poured my last quart of Spectro 50wt oil into the tank and kicked started the bike for the last leg of the trip.

Before leaving the Days Inn in Carson City, we both made some final adjustments to our bikes.  ...


Before leaving the Days Inn in Carson City, we both made some final adjustments to our bikes.  Now that we are so close to our final destination, it would be foolish to have something like a loose chain or poorly adjusted valves possibly put an end to the ride.  Once both bikes were packed and ready, we rode back into the mountains, making our way to Lake Tahoe.

Ely, NV turned out to be the wettest place we camped.  This is partially my fault since I forgot ...


Ely, NV turned out to be the wettest place we camped.  This is partially my fault since I forgot to remove my sheepskin seat cover, so of course it rained all night.  Then in the morning we were hit with a heavy fog, which locked in the moisture and kept everything nice and wet.  With the prospect of sitting on a wet sheepskin all morning, I decided the best coarse of action was just to wear my rain pants.  Plus it was still pretty cold and an extra layer seemed like a good idea.

Day 16 was the start of a two day push across Nevada.  For once we were up early and packed bef...


Day 16 was the start of a two day push across Nevada.  For once we were up early and packed before 9:00, so we used the extra hour to eat breakfast with Trip and his family.  Then it was time to lay down some miles.  Salina was a little more than halfway across Utah, so we still had 160 miles to ride just to reach Nevada.  With a bigger than usual breakfast filling our stomachs, we planned to ride straight to Nevada, waiting to eat lunch until we had crossed into the "Sagebrush State."  Once again we headed west on Route 50 and settled in for a four hour ride across the western half of Utah.

When your riding in Utah, it seems like every mile is filled with spectacular scenery.  The sho...


When your riding in Utah, it seems like every mile is filled with spectacular scenery.  The shot above was taken alongside I-70 as we made our way west from Moab.  I think I could have spent the entire trip in Utah, stopping at every overlook as I crisscrossed between National Parks.  There was so much to see and I feel like we only just scratched the surface as we shot across the state at 50 mph.

Leaving Mesa Verde behind us, it was only a short ride across the border and into Utah.  If you...


Leaving Mesa Verde behind us, it was only a short ride across the border and into Utah.  If your paying attention, you'll notice that Tim's bike (that's the red one on the right) now has a 2.5 gallon gas can strapped to the back.  We've been warned that there are some 100+ mile stretches between gas stops and with Tim's bike getting 35mpg it seemed prudent to carry some extra fuel.  Tim's range is about 120 miles, but there is no need to take any chances...

Day 13 wasn't a Friday, but it sounded like it was an unlucky day for some of the local w...


Day 13 wasn't a Friday, but it sounded like it was an unlucky day for some of the local wildlife.  At around 5AM, we were awakened by howls from a pack of coyotes who had just made a kill.  That really came as no surprise as the local deer population was so tame that they just walked in and out of the campsites, oblivious to the campers.  Probably made for easy pickings for the resident carnivores.